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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 25  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 85-89

Risk Factors Affecting Complications of Access Site in Vascular Intervention through Common Femoral Artery


1 Department of Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, Samsung Changwon Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Changwon, Korea
2 Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Samsung Changwon Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Changwon, Korea
3 Department of Radiology, Samsung Changwon Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Changwon, Korea

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Y G Song
Department of Radiology, Samsung Changwon Hospital, Sunggkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 158, Paryong-ro, Masanhoewon-gu, Changwon-si, Gyeongsangnam-do 51353
Korea
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/njcp.njcp_37_21

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Backgrounds: Traditionally, vascular interventions have been performed through the femoral artery. Aims: The purpose of this study was to evaluate risk factors affecting access-site complications in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma or peripheral arterial disease in lower extremity who underwent vascular intervention by accessing the common femoral artery (CFA). Patients and Methods: From December 2015 to November 2018, 287 patients underwent transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) or peripheral vascular intervention with ultrasound (US)-guided CFA access. Standard 18-gauge (G) access was used in 127 patients and Micropuncture® 21-G needles in 160 patients. Most access sites were managed with vascular closure devices and several were managed with manual compression. Within 24 hours after the procedure, all patients underwent US to evaluate the puncture site. Results: Access-site complications occurred in 55 of 287 patients: 34 hematomas (11.9%), 20 pseudoaneurysms (7.0%), and 1 dissection (0.4%). In the crude model, risk factors related to access-site complications were the usage of 18-G needles (OR, 2.18; 95% CI, 1.17-4.07; P = 0.014), smoking (OR, 2.23; 95% CI, 1.16-4.27; P = 0.016), and approach route (OR, 3.23; 95% CI, 1.33-7.82; P = 0.009). Needle size (OR, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.10-4.12; P = 0.025) was the only factor associated with access-site complications in the adjusted model. Conclusion: Needle profile was the only factor associated with access-site complications in this study. Therefore, a needle with a smaller profile than an 18-G needle will reduce the incidence of complications at the access site.


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