Medical and Dental Consultantsí Association of Nigeria
Home - About us - Editorial board - Search - Ahead of print - Current issue - Archives - Submit article - Instructions - Subscribe - Advertise - Contacts - Login 
  Users Online: 769   Home Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size
 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2010  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 388-393

Early onset pregnancy-induced hypertension/eclampsia in Benin City, Nigeria


1 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, College of Health Sciences, Delta State University, Abraka, Nigeria
2 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
P N Ebeigbe
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, College of Health Sciences, Delta State University, Abraka
Nigeria
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 21220851

Rights and PermissionsRights and Permissions

Context: Pregnancy - induced hypertension/eclampsia is a major cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality in Nigeria. There have been very few studies focused on early onset pregnancy induced hypertension/eclampsia in Nigerian women Objectives: To determine the incidence, clinical features and outcome of cases of early onset pregnancy-induced hypertension /eclampsia in a Nigerian tertiary hospital, and compare maternofetal outcome in early and late onset disease. Methods : A retrospective study of all cases of early onset pregnancy induced hypertension/eclampsia seen over a five-year period in a tertiary hospital. Main outcome measures : Severity of disease, rates of induction of labour, caesarean section rate, maternal mortality, abruptio placenta, still births, severe birth asphyxia and early neonatal deaths. Results : Early onset pregnancy induced hypertension/eclampsia contributed 6.3% of all cases of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy with an incidence of 1:141 deliveries. Most cases presented at between 28-32 weeks gestation (78.3%) The disease was severe at presentation or rapidly progressive in 39 cases (84.8%) leading to delivery within 72 hours of presentation. Caesarean section was the mode of delivery in 58.7% of cases. The perinatal survival rate was 34.0%. Early onset pregnancy induced hypertension was associated with significantly higher risk of presenting with eclampsia, having induction of labour and worse perinatal outcome than late onset disease. Conclusion : Most cases of early onset pregnancy induced hypertension in the study population presented with severe and rapidly progressive disease and were associated with significantly higher risk of obstetric intervention and worse perinatal outcome than late onset disease.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed8407    
    Printed234    
    Emailed2    
    PDF Downloaded1136    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 1    

Recommend this journal